Oxfordshire Artweeks

I'm looking forward to Artweeks this year. I shall be exhibiting at home for 2 weekends and I will be there throughout. For several years I have found galleries and venues to exhibit my work in but I realised I missed out on seeing the visitors coming to look at my work. This seems to be a fundamental principle of Artweeks, an opportunity for people to see artists in their studios and talk to them about their work. This has to be one of the most rewarding parts of an artist’s

Scale

One of the exercises I like to do with my students is to ask them to draw something that is very small on a much larger scale. This is often quite a challenge especially to students who haven't drawn for a long time. A large piece of paper is daunting and we feel quite exposed at the prospect of working so large. But if you continue to work really small you are not able to represent as much as you can see. Take an object such as the simple screw for example. If you draw that

Making a mark

Watching the Big Painting Challenge on BBC 1 this Sunday I was pleased to hear mentor Pascal Anson refer to mark making and asking participants not to make marks for the sake of it but to make marks with the paint that “mean something”. This is a difficult but important concept to grasp. It is easy to give in to a desire to splash the paint on without really considering its impact and asking yourself important questions such as what colour and which brush should I use? and ho

Drawing has meaning

I am enjoying Andrew Marr’s “A short book about Drawing” documenting his love of drawing and how it helped him recover following his stroke. Like Marr I agree that “drawing has meaning, it immerses you freshly in the planet you were born on”. When I teach I feel real satisfaction when my students start returning after a few weeks of classes with me to say “I look at everything differently now”. It is only when we start to think about committing what we see to paper that we re